Economic Geography

Economic geography is the study of how human economic activities – production, consumption, and exchange – vary across space, with a focus on resource endowments, international trade and commerce, population growth, settlements, development, interaction and interdependencies, and regional supply and demand.

Geography and Inequality

Mark Altaweel

Simple examples of geographic social inequality can be found in major cities, where wealthier urban people generally have access to more housing, food shops, basic amenities, healthcare, and other infrastructure than the urban poor.

NASA's Night Lights 2012 Map. Source: NASA, public domain.

Geography and Globalization

Mark Altaweel

Globalization, significantly impacting society, has been a popular subject among human geographers.

The introduction of fracking fluids very drastically changes the underground microbial ecosystems which become dominated by bacteria that thrive in highly saline environments including those of a new genus named Frackibacter. Figure from Daly et al. (2016).

Microbial Life in Fracking Fluids

A.J. Rohn

The introduction of fracking fluids very drastically changes the underground microbial ecosystems which become dominated by bacteria that thrive in highly saline environments including those of a new genus named Frackibacter.

USGS fishery biologists direct a trawl net as it is released into Lake Huron from a research fishing boat.

Eco­-certification Trends in Fisheries

A.J. Rohn

A recent study by researchers in Newfoundland and North Carolina looks at new trends in eco-certification and the attendant power dynamics between the parties engaged on a global scale.

Map showing the percentage of population with access to electricity. Source: World Bank, 2011-2015.

African Hydropower News

A.J. Rohn

The construction of hydroelectric dams in Sub-Saharan Africa provides the opportunity to bring more power to the region and prepare for rapidly growing populations and offers benefits to health, agriculture, and more